Home Remedies for Nausea, Migraine Relief, & How to Sleep Better Blog – Tagged "pregnancy tips" – NoMoNauseaBand

Fetal Hiccups: Why Do Babies Get Hiccups in the Womb

Have you ever felt your belly popping and it’s not a baby kick? Your baby has hiccups… Yes, even babies in utero can get hiccups, but why? I’m the doctor who is going to give you some cool fun facts that you probably didn’t know about your babies like what they are doing in there and even how to stop the hiccups.

baby hiccups in the womb

Why Babies Get Hiccups in the Womb?

Hiccups are one of the many different movements your baby makes while in the womb. It is perfectly normal for your baby to get hiccups in utero. They signify that your baby is developing well.

Fetal hiccups refer to quick little repetitive movements your baby makes while in the womb. The movements are caused by your baby’s diaphragm's contraction when it inhales amniotic fluid into the lungs.  

Fetal hiccups are similar to adult hiccups, but adult hiccups are usually followed by rapid air entry, rather than amniotic fluid.

Most women feel when their growing babies get hiccups, although some may confuse them with baby kicks. Your baby may begin hiccupping as early as late in your first trimester, but you may not notice them until late in your second trimester.

Some other first-trimester amazing side effects include morning sickness which I talk all about it in Episode 1, 2, 9, 13, & 60. If you want relief in seconds use the natural selection that OBGYN’s choose called NoMo Nausea. It’s a wristband used in hospitals that combines essential oils and acupressure to instantly stop your worst pregnancy nausea and vomiting. 


 

Most first-time moms-to-be notice their baby’s hiccups when they are 20 weeks pregnant while those who have had a prior pregnancy can notice their babies' hiccups as early as 16 weeks.

Your baby's hiccups are easily felt when your baby gets bigger. However, the frequency of fetal hiccups should decrease when you are a few weeks from giving birth.

What Causes Fetal Hiccups?

Your baby gets hiccups in the womb because of the contraction of its diaphragm as it practices breathing. They show that your baby is experiencing good developmental milestones.

When your baby gets hiccups, it indicates that its diaphragm is developing well, making it able to inhale and exhale amniotic fluid.

Fetal hiccups suggest your baby has an intact and well-functioning nervous system. A nerve activates the contraction of the diaphragm of the baby. When your baby gets hiccups, it shows that it is getting ready to breathe independently and survive outside your uterus.

When your baby gets hiccups in the womb, it also suggests that it is practicing vital reflexes such as suckling, which are useful when it is born.

baby hiccups in the womb

When Should You Be Worried?

It is usual for your baby to get hiccups, and you should not worry about them in most cases. However, when your baby gets hiccups several times a day, especially in the last weeks of your pregnancy, it could be a sign that it is not getting enough blood and oxygen. It can occur due to the compression or prolapse of the umbilical cord, which contains the blood vessels supplying your baby.

Therefore, if you notice frequent fetal hiccups in a day, it would best you inform your doctor as soon as possible. Cord compression or prolapse is associated with changes to your baby’s blood pressure, heart rate, accumulation of blood carbon dioxide levels, brain damage, and consequently cause stillbirth.

Experience strong and longer fetal hiccups after 28 weeks call for an evaluation. You may want to see your doctor to check if there is a problem and get reassurance to get peace of mind.

How to Stop Fetal Hiccups in Utero

While fetal hiccups are usually not painful, they may make you feel uncomfortable. Sometimes they can be much distracting, making it difficult to relax – they may disrupt your sleep. Here are tips to help you stop fetal hiccups in the womb.

  • Lie on your left side.
  • Support your tummy using pillows to relieve pressure on your spine.
  • Perform moderate exercises that are safe to do.
  • Drink plenty of water to help you stay hydrated
  • Eat a healthy pregnancy diet.
  • Have a regular sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. Take a nap as necessary during the day.
  • Change positions and walk around.

While the above tips can help stop fetal hiccups, you also need to learn to embrace them until a time when they disappear.

stop fetal hiccups

How to cure hiccups for adults

Hold your breath, increases the amount of carbon dioxide & force the diaphragm that forces CO2 to stop contracting. 

Sound is your epiglottis involuntarily contracts and makes the sound. 


Pregnancy Diet: What to Eat during Pregnancy

What to Eat During Pregnancy?

 Learn the perfect pregnancy diet and doctor-recommended amounts of food to eat when pregnant during Pregnancy Pukeology Podcast Episode 16. Dr. PukeNoMo answers the most common questions about what and how much of each food group you should be consuming, the nutritional value of food versus pill vitamins, and the real story behind good fats and salt. This podcast is perfect for all women, who are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant and want answers for the best information about pregnancy that there is to date. 

Listen to "Pregnancy Diet: What To Eat During Pregnancy In Pregnancy Pukeology Podcast Episode 16" on Spreaker.

What is Pregnancy Diet?

There is no such thing as a “pregnancy diet,” but being pregnant you should be eating “real food.” Nutritional foods are the best way of taking in nutrients, and if you are interested in learning more read "Real Food for Pregnancy" by Lily Nichols. 

   Healthy babies are the result of learning from historical cultures that had good eating habits. Groups from the 1900s like Swiss (who still have one of the most stringent food regulations to this day), Eskimos, Malay tribes, Maori of New Zealand, Native Pacific Islanders – Polynesians, Australian Aborigines, and South Americans of the Amazon basin where my family is from, Peru. They all have nutrient content of foods in comparison to imported foods. The difference was dramatic, and their children did not suffer health problems like tooth decay, narrow palate, crooked teeth, club foot, neural tube defects, poor immune health like tuberculosis, psychological problems as cultures who ate foods of modern commerce like sugar and refined grains. 

   Real foods maximize nutrient density, meaning the about of absorbed nutrients per item that you eat. Fresh in-season vegetables that are grown without pesticides, minimally processed foods, full-fat dairy from grass-fed cows, and foods that don’t have a label. 

   Before I start talking about what and how much you should be eating during your pregnancy, make sure you know the 5 foods you SHOULD NOT eat because they are detrimental to the health of your baby in Pregnancy Pukeology Podcast Episode 5 "Foods To Avoid While Pregnant Pregnancy Pukeology Podcast Episode 5" on Spreaker.

   The meal breakdown looks like a pie cut into fourths, where vegetables take up half, carbs are ¼, and protein and fats are the other ¼.pregnancy diet  what to eat during pregnancy what to eat when pregnant  diet during pregnancy  pregnancy food diet for pregnant women foods to avoid during pregnancy healthy food for pregnant women healthy pregnancy diet food for pregnant women pregnancy diet plan what not to eat when pregnant  foods to avoid when pregnant  food during pregnancy nutrition during pregnancy foods to eat during pregnancy pregnancy nutrition  healthy food for pregnancy pregnancy diet chart  healthy food during pregnancy what not to eat while pregnant what not to eat during pregnancy  healthy diet for pregnant women healthy diet during pregnancy  good food for pregnancy foods to avoid while pregnant best diet for pregnancy what to eat while pregnant  foods to eat when pregnant  best food for pregnant women pre pregnancy diet foods to eat while pregnant pregnant lady diet healthy eating during pregnancy pregnancy planner pregnancy diet menu

  • Vegetables: 

2 cups+ adding some fat like butter or olive oil

Non-Starchy Vegetables have little effect on blood sugar and are great sources of fiber. Fiber is especially helpful for keeping you pooping by acting as fuel for your intestinal bacteria (probiotics), but it also slows down how quickly your body breaks down carbohydrates into sugar.  

   Vegetables are better absorbed when eaten with some fat. I know you’ve been told your whole life that fat is bad but think of good fat as your baby’s brain food since their tiny brain is 60% fat. 

   Get your baby use to healthy foods in utero, and YES your baby can “taste” what you’re eating via your amniotic fluid. Make non-picky eaters all in your belly. 

  • Carbohydrates: 

0.5 to 1 cup of starchy or carbohydrate-rich foods

   Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient or something that gives you energy, that significantly raises your blood sugar. If you eat too many of these carbs, your baby can grow unhealthily large (medically known as macrosomia), and on average pregnancy weight gain is 18 pounds heavier than women who ate mainly unprocessed carbs. It’s so sad that 49-52% of adults in the US have either diabetes or prediabetes and that it's on the rise at an alarming rate according to the Journal of American Medical Association.

A high carbohydrate diet during pregnancy is also linked to an increased chance of developing Gestational Diabetes, preeclampsia, gall bladder disease (gallstones), and babies having metabolic problems like heart disease later on in life. But ALL carbs aren’t bad! Great sources include carbs from starchy vegetables, legumes (like beans, lentils, split peas), fruits, milk, and yogurt too. Anything from grains like flour has a higher glycemic index than those that I just listed.

  • Protein & Fat:

3-4 oz of protein, and go ahead and eat the fat on the skin of the chicken (it’s good for you). 

   Do you remember being a kid and hearing don’t eat the yoke? Well, the age-old debate is still going strong. I’m here to tell you to eat the yolk, especially while pregnant because it is an excellent source of choline, a relative of B-vitamins. 94% of women do not get the 450mg of choline needed per day. A low choline diet is a major risk factor for neural tube defects.

   You also get a lot of Vitamin A in egg yolks, which is important for proper lung and liver development, and a lack of Vitamin A is highly associated with a low birth weight baby. 

   Omega 3 fat, also called DHA, is found in fatty fish, seafood, grass-fed meat, and pasture-raised eggs and is important in developing the baby’s brain and vision. Too many oils like corn, soy, cottonseed, and safflower oil inhibit the synthesis or creation of DHA. Usually, in processed foods like salad dressing and fried foods, the amount of Omega-6 to Omega-3 is skewed 30:1, and infants of women with this high ratio are twice as likely to experience developmental delays. 

   So what fats are good with your protein? Chicken skin, steaks, and full-fat dairy. There is strong evidence showing eating high-fat dairy improves fertility, and those women pregnant thru IVF have the highest chances of a live birth who consumed dairy products with mostly dairy fat. 

  • Fluids:

   The Institute of Medicine recommends that all pregnant women should drink about 100z of fluids a day. It is over six water bottles! Now, remember that the milk in your cereal and decaffeinated tea also counts as your total. Your pee should be a pale yellow signifying you are well hydrated. If you are curious about how your bladder changes during the third trimester check out Episode 11 "Frequent Urination In Pregnancy from Early Signs Of Pregnancy to Third Trimester" on Spreaker.

  • Salt:

   Salt, sodium chloride, is the body's electrolyte. Redistributing itself by shifting water inside and outside of the cell. Pregnant women are well known for cramping because they are not getting enough of these two electrolytes plus potassium. Salt supports normal stomach acid levels by supplying chloride (it is the chloride in hydrochloric acid, and the hydrogen is the acidic portion causing the pH to be very low). Good stomach acid pH is needed to absorb minerals and vitamin B12, protein digestion, and pathogenic bacteria the food you eat leaves in your stomach. Now ladies with pre-eclampsia, please reduce your salt intake. Everyone else add a little salt to your kale (it makes it taste WAY better).

If you are experiencing any nausea, migraine or cannot fall asleep when it is bed time, try NoMo Bands. They provide natural relief within seconds and will become a part of your essentials.



Tips & Tricks from Dr. PukeNoMo

Conventional nutrition suggests that pregnant women eat fortified foods during pregnancy like cereal with fortified folic acid and iron while ignoring the foods that are sourced naturally. And low-fat diets are thought as favorable, but they lack the richest food sources of Vitamin A, choline, iron, and zinc. 

   Did you know that only 25% of accredited US medical schools require a nutrition course? (I did in traditional medicine, but I was required as a naturopath.) So if our doctors aren’t talking about nutrition, who else is? 

   It’s all about quality over quantity. Ladies, you are NOT eating for two. It is suggested that after your first trimester you need about 300 extra calories per day, which is about an extra snack. 

  Here’s a list of some great low-carb snacks.

  1.  Nuts: Almonds, cashews, walnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, and sunflower seeds
  2.  Beef jerky without MSG (a preservative found in a lot of Chinese foods for flavor, but it is linked to headaches and migraines. Check out www.NoMoMigraine.com for natural relief for both.)
  3. Plain greek yogurt and some berries
  4. Guacamole with celery and bell peppers
  5. Small balsamic salad with pine nuts and goat cheese
  6. Hard-boiled egg with salt and pepper
  7. Deviled egg
  8. Caprese Salad (tomatoes, basil, mozzarella cheese, and balsamic vinegar)
  9. Olives and dill pickles (who doesn’t like the two when pregnant)
  10. Kale chips
  11. Grilled chicken breast with pesto and parmesan
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Now let’s get into the meal breakdown. For your convenience we made it in a picture, so you could easily print it out and put on the fridge.

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Vegetarian mommies head over to Chapter 3 of "Real Food for Pregnancy" by Lily Nichols to see what alternatives are necessary for healthy eating habits for herbivores.

Pregnancy Symptoms for Each Trimester and All Natural Remedies

Pregnancy Symptoms at 1st Trimester 2nd, Trimester and 3rd Trimester

Want to know what each trimester has in store? Or maybe you're desperate for natural relief from pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, leg and back cramps, breast tenderness, or swollen feet. But not to fear, NoMo Nausea is here! Keep reading to find out why you’re feeling this kind of way and learn some fantastic tips to relieve some of these uncomfortable symptoms.

April 23, 2019 by Maya Glander